QUICK READ:

  • Casper has highlighted the growing power of social media influencers to make or break brands, naming its own online advocates as one of the risk factors facing its initial public offering.
  • Influencer marketing has expanded into an $8bn business as celebrities, experts and other people with large followings on social media platforms charge thousands of dollars to promote products.
  • But many influencers have BOTS as followers.
  • Influencers have no way to prove they “influence” — neither in quantity nor in quality — and brands have to be very realistic about what they stand to gain from such collaborations, if at all.
When your brand relies on influencers

SUMMARY: After explosive growth, the $8bn influencer marketing business may for the first time be showing signs of strain. Brands are beginning to question the returns that influencers actually generate, especially as the get-rich-quick appeal of digital celebrity is now attracting fraudsters who pay for fake followings. But what about brand advocate influencers?

<b>Celebrity influencers:</b><i> Has their time past?</i>
  • A study confirmed that 59 percent of all links shared on social networks aren’t actually clicked on at all, implying the majority of article shares aren’t based on actual reading. 
  • People are sharing articles without ever getting past the headlines
  • Attention spans are at an all-time low, and most users make snap decisions about articles based on their first impressions, which happen to be headlines.
  •  Influencers have no way to prove they “influence” — neither in quantity nor in quality — and brands have to be very realistic about what they stand to gain from such collaborations, if at all.
The influencer bubble