Use social media to reach superconsumers

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Superconsumers represent 10% of a category’s customers but account for 30% to 70% of sales and an even higher share of profits according to an article in HBR . It’s easy to reach them. This means that you can dramatically increase the efficiency of your advertising and promotions. Instead of trying to activate lapsed users through expensive mass- market campaigns or paying large sums to deliver coupons to customers who haven’t bought your product in months (and probably won’t buy it now), you can focus your efforts on a narrow slice of your customer base. Direct and digital marketing are often much more effective with super- consumers than with others. That effectiveness can be especially valuable to large CPG companies, some of which spend billions of dollars a year on advertising—and for which a 1% increase in the efficiency of ad spending can therefore be worth tens of millions of dollars.

 “The most important thing we’ve learned in our work with companies that have decided to focus on superconsumers is that the new strategy can become a rallying cry for an organization—particularly one that has been marketing an old, slow- growing product perceived as unexciting.”  These superconsumers are the ones who came to your website looking for new products or new ways to use current products but your social media strategy has to be targeted towards THEM; not a bigger audience

It’s important to distinguish superconsumers from other segments of buyers. They aren’t quite the same as “heavy users”—a product’s highest-volume buyers, in traditional marketing terms. Heavy users are defined simply by the quantity of their purchases.

Superconsumers are defined by both economics and attitude: They are a subset of heavy users who are highly en- gaged with a category and a brand. They are especially interested in innovative uses for the product and in new variations on it. They aren’t particularly price sensitive. Superconsumers tend to have more occasions and “jobs” for a product.

I now know that I am a superconsumer for Keurig single serve coffee and Trek bikes.  I follow both on social media hoping to learn of new products or new riding ideas but their social media feeds are targeted towards acquiring new customers and do not appeal to me a superconsumer.

SuperConsumers

According to HBR “it’s easy to reach them. This means that you can dramatically increase the efficiency of your advertising and promotions. Instead of trying to activate lapsed users through expensive mass- market campaigns or paying large sums to deliver coupons to customers who haven’t bought your product in months (and probably won’t buy it now), you can focus your efforts on a narrow slice of your customer base. Direct and digital marketing are often much more effective with super- consumers than with others. That effectiveness can be especially valuable to large CPG companies, some of which spend billions of dollars a year on advertising—and for which a 1% increase in the efficiency of ad spending can therefore be worth tens of millions of dollars.”

superconsumers

This is a great point.  The article uses Velveeta cheese as an example and details how focusing on superconsumers helped Kraft successfully launch line extensions.

My thesis is that superconsumers comprise the social media users who read your feeds everyday, not the ones looking for deals and discounts.  Brands would do well to reach these superconsumers with different messages than prospects.