Print coupons more effective than digital coupons

Adults are displaying a greater preference for paper coupons than paperless discounts. Some 39% agree that they prefer to get paperless discounts from the internet that they can download onto their store shopper/loyalty card. Meanwhile, slightly fewer (36%) prefer paperless discounts on their smartphone/mobile device.

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]Consumer preference for paper coupons is reflected in their high usage of them: fully 93% claim to use some form of paper coupon, up from 88% last year.[/inlinetweet]

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]83% of U.S. shoppers1 switch between online and offline purchase channels across categories[/inlinetweet], which can make them elusive and difficult to engage. These trends all present unique challenges for manufacturers and retailers, requiring constant innovation to adapt to shopper nuances and keep consumer engagement, activation and retention high.

Physical retail locations remain relevant to consumers, as a majority of consumers say they shop in-store for food, HH goods, and HBC products. [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]According to a study by the National Retail Federation, 79% of consumers typically buy half or less of the items they need online[/inlinetweet]. The study also found [inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]86% buy their groceries mostly or entirely in-store and 64% do so for their personal care and beauty purchases[/inlinetweet]

Do shoppers really need to go online for ketchup and pasta sauce?  The answer to that os NO.  In fact, one of the biggest mistakes marketers make is believing that people want to have a relationship with their brand.[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]  I mean, how many products in your pantry do you want to have a relationship with?[/inlinetweet]

[inlinetweet prefix=”” tweeter=”” suffix=””]The bottom line: FSI’s and other paper coupons are still very effective, even in the digital age.[/inlinetweet]