Learning Beats Knowing

UnknownStrangely enough, in today’s workplace there are situations where what you don’t know ends up being far more valuable than what you do.How can that be? Time and again, rookies who know nothing about a field come along and end up outperforming the veterans who have years of experience in the industry. This phenomena demonstrates the fact when it comes to the new game of work, learning beats knowing most of the time. That’s the essence of rookie smarts.

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A common sense approach to web usability

screenshot_1262The principles of good web design are “just common sense” and you can learn to apply them. A great website must have usability, in that it must work for customers, serve your purposes and be easy to use. If clients find your site difficult to use, they’ll avoid it, and yet there’s no single right approach to designing a website. To begin, simplify your site. “Don’t make me think!” is the “first law of usability.”

People should never be confused about what to do, where to go or what to click to find what they want. Make everything on your site “obvious and clickable.” If your users have to ask about how things work, they’ll get distracted. Even if their “mental chatter” only lasts “a fraction of a second,” it’s too long. Users should never, ever have to ask, “Where am I?” or “Where should I begin?” What you can’t “make…self-evident,” make “self-explanatory.” Continue reading »

Focus on your branded website, not social media

iStockForrester found that visiting a company’s website is the number one way fans prefer to stay in touch with the brands [/inlinetweet]they love, outranking Facebook all the way down at number five.   While their Facebook pages are brimming with exciting, yet unseen content, brand websites may be neglected – at a high cost to community interaction. Continue reading »

Decade of flat wages:Implications for marketers

imagesAccording to EPI’s The State of Working America, 12th Edition the wage and benefit growth of the vast majority, including white-collar and blue-collar workers and those with and without a college degree, has stagnated, as the fruits of overall growth have accrued disproportionately to the richest households. According to every major data source, the vast majority of U.S. workers—including white-collar and blue-collar workers and those with and without a college degree—have endured more than a decade of wage stagnation. Wage growth has significantly underperformed productivity growth regardless of occupation, gender, race/ethnicity, or education level.  This is pretty significant for CPG markers.  Continue reading »

Why suggesting social media managers should be below 25 is stupid

Someone, who obviously is not thinking clearly,  suggested that social media managers need to be under 25 in order to really understand social media marketing.  I have always believed that age should not be a factor in hiring someone to do a job it should be determined by who the hell can do the best job.  However, I did write an article that said “interns make coffee and should not be the voice of your brand on social media” which brought a lot of comments.  The fact is that social media marketing is too damn important to leave to anyone who is inexperienced in marketing and branding. Continue reading »

Measuring the end to end customer experience

measure-successBig data can rarely measure your end to end customer experience and it’s easy for the end to end customer experience to get lost in data, numbers, and meetings to discuss improving sales.  According to Baiju Shah, managing director of strategy and innovation for Accenture Interactive today’s consumer expects relevant and seamless experiences end-to-end across marketing, commerce, and service. In the era of social media, with consumers keen to broadcast their delight or despair, a brand’s ability to deliver a connected and relevant experience to each individual becomes critical for success. Continue reading »

Social media experts are only experts at promoting themselves

Earlier last week I was contacted by a large consumer products company with a problem.  It seems they had hired “a social media expert” to help them develop and launch their social media marketing but now that ship was adrift and was getting pounded by the rocks under the waves.  Not only was it poorly executed but what they had done so far was costing them business. Their social media “expert” was hit and run.  He told them what to do but not how to do it within THEIR culture and industry. Continue reading »