Category Archives: Analytics

TV still rules time for consumers

woman TVFor consumers, having content options is no longer a luxury, but an imperative.  But having a plethora of content options at our collective fingertips doesnʼt necessarily mean consumers are connecting with ALL choices ALL of the time. In fact, according to the second quarter Nielsen Total Audience Report, behaviors and usage are unique to the device being used. Consumers still spend most of their time on traditional platforms , but they also look to explore the wide range of content channels made available by new media.

Continue reading

Online marketing is in trouble

Trouble-AheadMichael Spencer writes “Snapchat, Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook have all shown declines in usage. In almost all countries, time spent on the four leading social media apps, Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat and Twitter had fallen. We cannot be surprised if the same holds true for LinkedIn.”  This, coupled with the news that up to 90% of online ad metrics could be caused by BOTS and the double digit increase in ad blockers means online marketing is in trouble.

Continue reading

Put an end to “big data” and start Analytics 3.0

all-you-need-to-know-about-big-dataAll over the Web there are a lot of infographics that convey data points but I would argue that data without analytics to help us understand why, how and where are pretty much meaningless.  In fact I would suggest that big data is over-hyped and that the real gold for marketers is the use of analytics that help us better understand consumers and customers. Continue reading

Mobile growing but PC’s still rule

screenshot_237According to Comscore “mobile platforms are not eating into aggregate time spent on desktop, which has still grown 37 percent over this time period.”  More than 3/4 of all digital users are now using both desktop and mobile platforms to access the Internet. Continue reading

Metrics of online ads questionable at best

713644918_reality_check_xlargeIn recent years the various participants in the online ad industry have bickered over “viewability”: webpages are usually bigger than the screens they are viewed on, so if a reader sees only part of an ad on his screen, for a fraction of a second, how much should the advertiser pay? The Media Rating Council (MRC), which sets the rules for audience measurement, now considers a display ad “viewable” if a consumer can see half of it for at least one second. Continue reading