92% ignore at least one type of ad

online advertising relevancePOST SUMMARY: Fully 92% of Americans ignore at least one type of ad, including: Online – 82% T elevision – 37% Radio – 36% Newspaper – 35%.  The online ads Americans are most likely to ignore included: online banner ads (73%), followed by social media ads (62%), and search engine ads (59%). The highest wage earners, those with a household income of $100k+ per year, were statistically more likely than those households making less than $50k per year (86% vs. 78%, respectively) to say they ignore online ads. Continue reading

Content providers don’t understand the Internet

unknownA report from the nonprofit ChangeAdvertising.org found that 41 of the top 50 news sites — including The Guardian, CNN, Time and Forbes — embed widgets from so-called content-recommendation companies .  These “teasers” often have titles like “famous last word of celebrities” and require users to click several pages to get stories thus being exposed to more ads.  It’s an insult to readers and a clear indication that they don’t understand users are in control not them. Continue reading

Social media users want to be surprised and delighted.

loyaltyAccording to a COLLOQUY study today’s avid social media users want to be surprised and delighted. They love, for example, receiving personalized deals that are relevant to them. Just be mindful of the “creepy factor.” Consumers of all stripes don’t enjoy feeling like they’re being stalked. Marketers can do their parts by making their messages highly relevant and interesting to their audiences. And acting like a real PERSON – that means being mindful of personal privacy and not continually trying to sell them, but it also means listening to them and understanding the true dynamics of a conversation. Continue reading

Has “common sense” marketing left the room?

Men are more responsive to online ads than women, according to an eye-tracking study by picture provider Shutterstock.  Men looked at the ads for 0.4 seconds longer than females (0.9 seconds vs 0.5 seconds) while noticing a third of the ads in the study, compared to a quarter for women.  This is an example of useless research and is a clear indication that some research companies don’t have any common sense. Continue reading

Northwestern University marketing professor gets it wrong

A study, done by Mr. Grayson and Mathew Isaac, a professor at Seattle University, and published in April in the Journal of Consumer Research, surveyed 400 participants regarding 20 common tactics used in television and digital ads. Thirteen of the tactics elicited favorable responses, which surprised even marketers. When you reside in academia instead of the real world you live with blinders on. Continue reading